The Plucky Ones | Q&A's : Ferris McGuinty

Ferris McGuinty is a local Cornish artist whose work spans across sculpture and assemblage to furniture and lighting. He collects humble pieces of stone, wood and wire and constructs them to become characterful and playful forms that magically maintain a sense of balance between line, colour, texture and volume. The result is captivating, free from ego and costly materials, each piece is rich with authenticity and charm like no other.

Ferris took some time over Easter to catch up and share more of his story and it's an absolute pleasure to go out with bang - as this will be the last interview in the Plucky Ones series - with such an incredible talent. Thank-you, Ferris! 

Ferris McGuinty

Please tell us about your background and journey to become an artist.

I'm a West Country boy, born in Somerset and now living in Cornwall. I moved down here 18 years ago to attend what was then, the "Falmouth College of Arts", to study Fine Art Sculpture. I loved the place so much, I've made it my home ever since, albeit with little flurries elsewhere at times; it somehow has a magic draw that lures you back!
When I finished art school, I felt I could take on anything, wow, I was wrong! It has taken me a while to find my voice with my practice.
When I was at art school, I was fascinated with the ideas behind scale. I used to make intricate and small models, tableaux and dioramas. Some of which I would photograph and the images would pose as real life spaces or situations, and some models I would leave as stand alone objects. They were really great. One thing I learned from this body of work, was that for its success it relied on its accessibility. The works really engaged the viewer, whether they were someone well versed in reading art or someone who had little experience and were just curious. The "hook" with this work was the shifts in the scales. It had the effect of being able to pull people in, putting them in an omnipotent potion. This then allowed the layers to unfold and reveal themselves.
A lot of time has passed since then in life and work, and I'm now, in answer to your question, I think only really still starting the journey.
I had a kind of rebirth in 2009 when living in Australia. It was a very creative period for me and alongside my own practice a new way of making emerged in the down-times. This was where Ferris was born. Ferris McGuinty is the pseudonym I now work under.

Ferris McGuinty

What does a typical Ferris McGuinty day look like? And what projects are you currently working on?

I'm not sure whether it's a good or bad thing, but there never seems anything typical to my days. When I'm making work, it usually begins with a lot of procrastinating! it just takes a bit of time to get over that blank page, and then generally I'm off and absorbed, on a path and in a direction that I try and let take me anywhere.
When I am producing work, it really does become a journey, and when I find that thread which appears, it becomes a lot easier. My work is typically process led. It really allows the materials to lead the conversation. The works generally form concise bodies that read better when seen together. At the moment, it's quite exciting. I'm producing a series of work for a gallery in New York.

Ferris McGuinty
Ferris McGuinty

You speak of your art as, "A reflection of the fragility of the world that surrounds us". Can you tell us your thoughts and processes behind the work.

When I embark on a new body of work, quite often I wont know where it might take me. I'm really interested in the tensions and balance created using the materials I gather together. The compositions seems to intuit themselves. There is a dynamic moment in the making where the elements play with each other until they find that still place. 

Ferris McGuinty

How does living in Cornwall influence you?

I've had a connection to Cornwall all my life. From coming down in the summers to visit family as a kid, to eventually studying here and making it home. What I find most inspiring about living down here , beside the obvious stunning natural beauty, is the space. There's room to breathe and think. I like living outside of the thick of it. Even though I'm not living in London I am surrounded by incredibly creative and interesting people, without any of the pretension or the bravado. It's a very freeing and nurturing place to be making work.

Acts of courage, however big or small can often have an impact to oneself or others, what's been your bravest moment?

I really can't profess to having any moments of braveness that I can recall. But I have born witness to two occasions which have blown me away. My wife giving birth to our children showed me beyond anything I have seen what it means to have courage and bravery.

Ferris McGuinty

If you could collaborate with anyone in the world, who would this be and what would you hope to make?

I have never made work collaboratively and I'm not sure how it would work. But recently I have been fantasising about my work on a public scale. I imagine it would be exciting to collaborate with an architect and to explore the assemblages on a much larger scale. I love the idea of the works coming out of the frames and mounted on entire elevations of buildings. The Hearst Tower in New York, designed by Norman Foster, used the work of Richard Long beautifully in this instance. I think there should be more public art.

Ferris McGuinty

Which creative plucky person/people do you admire and why?

James Turrell. If you haven't come across his work yet I really encourage you to discover him. I remember the first time experiencing his work in the flesh. It was in the Gagosian Gallery in Kings Cross in 2010 and it was a life changer.
With out wanting to sound too cosmic, his work elevated you to a higher place and grounds you at the same time. He is the master of light and perception. His work has changed the way I look at things. We are really lucky to have one of his "Sky Holes" installed down near Penzance


Feist Forest

Yesterday, I did it. I pressed the launch button for Feist Forest. Together with Ben, albeit in different locations, we make wooden work tables to bring independent minds, skills and positive ideas together. A wooden table with creativity and nature at its core. Not factory-made but handcrafted, one at a time and responsibly in the UK. A table for the vagabonds, dreamers and makers who courageously make great ideas happen.

It would not of been possible without the help of the talented makers, Ben and Mike, family and friends as well as the plucky individuals who feature on this blog who've encouraged me to start and keep going when the treading-through-treacle stage struck. A big hearty thanks to you all. I'm stoked to get started and look forward to hearing your thoughts! 

Feist Forest
Feist Forest
Feist Forest

+1 Co-op

Robe Lowe AKA, Supermundane has invited a selection of artists (some of my favourites) to produce an edition of 64 prints, one for every artist involved, plus one extra that can be purchased from the +1 Co-op shop. More artworks are yet to be revealed. Keep an eye on the £12 prize.

Cody Hudson

Cody Hudson

Holly Wales

Holly Wales

Neasden Control Centre

Neasden Control Centre

Antti Uotila

Antti Uotila

Skip Ahoy!

Fascinated by Thorunn Arnadottir's collection, Skip Ahoy! The quirky range was born out of a project called: 'Austurland: Designs from Nowhere', initiated and curated by Karna Sigurdardottir and Pete Collard. The project aimed to explore the possibilities of small-scale design and production in East Iceland, using locally sourced materials and skills.


Catching up with Thorunn, she shared her story of working alongside the team at Egersund who make and repair fishing nets. Using the same materials and techniques, but on a smaller scale, she created the curious collection from materials from their workshop. Focusing on ‘playtime’, the range features skipping ropes, hula hoops, bags and key-chains made from hard wearing net material in a variety of colours. Some pieces in the collection include reindeer antlers and bones as handles, bringing together elements from land and sea in East Iceland. Some of the products also include material that was no longer in use at the factory. Even though the factory waste would have been sent for recycling, I love how Thorunn has extended the life-span of the material bringing a smile and a whole lot of fun to her community before it too can be recycled at the end of it's playful life. To see more: thorunndesign.com 

Skip Ahoy - Thorunn Design
Skip Ahoy - Thorunn Design
Skip Ahoy - Thorunn Design
Skip Ahoy - Thorunn Design
Skip Ahoy - Thorunn Design

Cat Bennett - Making Waves

Cat Bennett is an artist and author with an infectious positive spirit and one who can see the creative potential in each and every one of us. I admire her tireless enthusiasm and nothing will stop her believing in you. I've not come across many people like Cat and I've been incredibly lucky to work with her these last couple months and I cannot recommend her books highly enough; The Confident Creative and Making Art A Practice

I asked Cat if I could share an extract from her first book, The Confident Creative and she kindly said yes. It's a real honour and a pleasure to share it with you today. 

Cat Bennett
It’s tempting to indulge in doomsday talk yet, everywhere we look, something else is happening too–consciousness is expanding. People everywhere are seeking to express themselves in visual, tangible, creative and honest ways. Old people and young people, and everyone in between. people are making jewellery and pottery, handbags, scarves and clothes for sale. They’re writing and making music and films. They’re taking photographs. They’re opening farmers’ markets and restaurants with healthy food. Many are creating ethical businesses with the intention of offering quality merchandise or services at fair prices. There are many ways to bring our true creativity into the world.

Artists are making prints and paintings and sculptures and drawings and photographs. Some of this art is for the public. Still others are making installations of such an esoteric nature that there’s little chance to sell the work, yet galleries are showing it anyway. Artists are taking the issues that face the planet and bringing attention to these issues through their art. Some are even envisioning solutions. Other art is more personal–the artists intends it for his or her own walls, or for family and friends. Some artists simply draw for the transformative pleasure of being fully present where they are. They know that presence brings peace. And we’re beginning to see that we can only create peace in this world when we find it first in ourselves. That is when we see that we are all one, no matter our colour, our beliefs, our stripes. Art is transformation.

If, when we draw. we can bring awareness to what we’re doing and to our thoughts, the practice of drawing changes who we are, the way we see, and what we create in our art and in our lives. It asks challenging things of us: that we never avert our eyes, that we tell the truth as we see it, and that we be ourselves. It asks us to have the courage to go where we haven’t been before. And it teaches us to be humble, to let go of control, and to receive the inspiration that comes to us and to act on it immediately, without hesitation.

I hope, that in the future, visual thinking and art making will be a more vital part of every child’s educational development, so that no one need lose touch with the creative side of themselves, or with careful observation and appreciation of the world around them. We need creative thinkers to create a new world. My wish is that we may all know the way art can open us to inspiration and positive action. Then we can be co-creators of our own lives and of life on our planet.

And now back to the drawing board! The world is waiting. And it needs us.
— Cat Bennett

Hilary Grant

It was a howler of a night as the wind whipped itself around our creaky house here in Devon, so I can only imagine the wildness that is being faced on the isle of Orkney, the home of knitwear and textile designer Hilary Grant. If anyone can be qualified in the art of staying toasty, Hilary is your girl. Along with a skilled team of craftsman, she creates colourful and practical knitted scarves, hats and gloves from high grade lambswool, throwing a lifeline to us teeth-chattering folk.

What I love about Hilary's work is that it's far-away from fast fashion and bang-on in terms of style and practicality, with each piece designed to be cherished winter after winter. And for those wondering if businesses can thrive when not based in a city, here's proof that with a wifi signal and a 'get-outta-here' ocean view, it is very much possible, along with a fascinating and authentic story to boot. To see more of Hilary's work and journey, be sure to check her website, Instagram and Facebook pages. 

Hilary Grant
Hilary Grant
Hilary Grant
Hilary Grant

Part-Time Crusader

A couple weeks ago, Jim Marsden, a passionate and talented photographer posted one of his trademark black and white photos along with an Edward Abbey quote on Instagram. A winning combination. After a couple weeks, it's still with me and when this happens you know it's good. If there's one career path to follow, part-time crusader sounds like the one.

Jim Marsden
One final paragraph of advice: do not burn yourselves out. Be as I am - a reluctant enthusiast….a part-time crusader, a half-hearted fanatic. Save the other half of yourselves and your lives for pleasure and adventure. It is not enough to fight for the land; it is even more important to enjoy it. While you can. While it’s still here. So get out there and hunt and fish and mess around with your friends, ramble out yonder and explore the forests, climb the mountains, bag the peaks, run the rivers, breathe deep of that yet sweet and lucid air, sit quietly for a while and contemplate the precious stillness, the lovely, mysterious, and awesome space. Enjoy yourselves, keep your brain in your head and your head firmly attached to the body, the body active and alive, and I promise you this much; I promise you this one sweet victory over our enemies, over those desk-bound men and women with their hearts in a safe deposit box, and their eyes hypnotized by desk calculators. I promise you this; You will outlive the bastards.

Neasden Control Centre

I often find myself trying to peer under the blanket of marketing and perfection to find the interesting and authentic bits. If there's any sign of imperfection or a mark of the human hand it makes me breathe a sigh of relief followed by a woop-yeah of excitement. Neasden Control Centre, AKA Stephen Smith is an artist and Illustrator who's work has an unapologetic honesty. Instinctive, unique and colourful. Whether it's art, Illustration, installations or ceramics, I'm very much in love with every bit of it. Here's just a small selection of his work. To see and learn more visit NeasdenControlCentre.com  

Stephen Smith/Neasden Control Centre
Stephen Smith/Neasden Control Centre
Stephen Smith/Neasden Control Centre
Stephen Smith/Neasden Control Centre
Stephen Smith/Neasden Control Centre

Breaking Rules

I hope for those reading this little blog of mine, you're not too fanatical about rules, as I've just broken a so-called blog one: 'Blog consistently, perhaps a couple posts a day.' Last year I decided this blog would be a find-something-I-honestly-love-and-post-it-type-blog. I hope you're still with me? Here goes, a chaotic and rule breaking wave of blog posts coming up this week, I hope you LOVE them.

Made You Look

There's a great film in the making, Made You Look, a feature length documentary exploring the UK Graphic Art scene and the challenges and triumphs of living in a hyper digital age. With interviews ranging from Anthony Burrill, Hattie Stewart to Adrian Johnson ( and many more), it reveals a fascinating insight into how creative people, although reliant on digital networks are also turning to mediums that take them away from their computers, making real, tactile items to be cherished and kept, instead of being consumed and forgotten. 

The MYL crew are at the final hurdle and looking for our help to complete the film and right here is the teaser trailer (below) and Kickstarter link.

The Plucky Ones | Q&A's: Zuzanna & Alexander of Thisispaper

"What we save, saves us. We value timeless over trendy, few over many and plain over fancy."

It was this statement that caught my attention and is the guiding principle for, Thisispaper, a Polish design studio, shop, blog and magazine, founded back in 2011. I was keen to learn more about the individual talent, approach and beliefs behind the brand that continues to provide us with quality and timeless products sourced locally and made by hand. Founders, Zuzanna and Alexander took the time to share their story and I am happy to welcome them as the 10th contributor to the Plucky Ones. Enjoy!

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

Hello Alexander and Zuzanna, could you share the story of how Thisispaper started? 

We started Thisispaper back in November 2011 as our own digital piece of land to cultivate as we please. We published daily posts with design projects that we liked - the idea was really that simple. What we believe set us apart from other blogs of this kind was the fact that we cared about the design of our website and its content equally. At first we were simultaneously working at our day jobs and running the blog, which was quite exhausting. When we got the idea to launch Thisispaper Shop, we gave up our jobs and decided to devote all our time to Thisispaper. Then, in a few months, everything accelerated - we launched Thisispaper Stories with longer articles to complement the daily blog, published the printed magazine and started hiring people to help. Now we have a team of 6, who are working on new projects and constantly improving the ones we already run.

This Is Paper - Plucky Ones Interview

From then, to now, what’s the 3 most valuable lessons learnt? 

1. Compromise never leads to anything good. There's a phrase in Polish, "rotten compromise", which does a good job at describing the dangers of settling for half-good solutions. They just don't work.

2. Never be complacent. We talked about complacency in our interview in Thisispaper Issue Two with Simon Watkins, the co-founder of Labour and Wait - an amazing shop in London. It's been running for 13 years now and is getting better all the time.  That's because Simon and Rachel never thought of the shop as something that is good enough to stop working on. We share their approach.

3. Take risks. That's what every entrepreneur will tell you.

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview
This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

What products are you most proud of since you launched your shop? 

We're proud of all bags and rucksacks we designed, but especially of those we made for Thisispaper's Autumn Collection. We feel that with these bags we managed to design something that's as functional as it's beautiful, and that has always been our aim. We have perfected every detail and made several prototypes before we arrived at the form we were entirely happy with. Moreover, they are made of 100% Polish materials and entirely in our studio, as all our bags are.

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

What’s your bravest moments and funniest memories?

We've got some funny memories with international guests. From time to time some of our international readers traveling to Warsaw misunderstand the information on our website, and think the address of our studio is the address of a shop (which doesn't exist). They show up at our door when we least expect them and there's always something funny resulting from this. All the unexpected guests that we've had so far were really friendly and like-minded, and we had nice conversations with them over lemonade in our kitchen.

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

What are your dreams for Thisispaper's future?

Probably what any company wishes for - evolve and grow but stick to our initial values.

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

Could you share a couple of your favourite books? 

Right now we're really into Polish books about sport from the 1950s and 60s. It may sound odd, but they all have amazing illustrations and pretty outlandish content. They inspired our new project, Sport Support, which launched in August.

This Is Paper - The Plucky Ones Interview

Who do you admire for their plucky and creative spirit?

The people we've featured in Thisispaper Issues One and Two. The team of Labour and Wait that we already mentioned, Faustine Steinmetz, Faye Toogood, Feilden Fowles, 6a Architects, Studiopepe and many more.

Hazel Stark's Naturally Dyed Collection

Hazel Stark's new Naturally Dyed #1 textile collection is here. An ethical and striking range, Hazel makes each piece from Oeko -Tex certified linens and coloured with organic dyes ranging from madder, weld to woad, all grown in the south of France, resulting in one heck of a candy coloured palette. As an owner of two of Hazel's previous ranges, I can vouch for the quality and care that goes into each and every design. Stark's latest collection features cushions, aprons, tablecloths, napkins and a mighty practical tote bag, all made to order from her London studio. Returning to the slow, careful, natural way of doing things, is for me, one to believe in, support and celebrate. And no compromises, they're beautiful to boot. You can see the full range here.

Hazel Stark - Naturally Dyed #1
Hazel Stark - Naturally Dyed #1
Hazel Stark - Naturally Dyed #1
Hazel Stark - cushions
Hazel Stark - Naturally Dyed #1

Woodworking Artist, Aleksandra Zee

From a studio in San Francisco, Woodworker Aleksandra Zee sources reclaimed wooden laths to create new Native American inspired patterned artworks. Zee's latest exhibition, Sea Salt, was formed of intricate chevron and herringbone inlaid installations, each in a limited pallet of bleached woods, whites and indigos.

In a recent interview (Dream Job Shop) Aleksandra shares her story of leaving her secure job as a Store Display Artist at Anthropologie to become independent, mastering her skills, creating commissions and building her business as well as her faithful Instagram following. Today she produces artworks that are not only beautiful but resourceful. Aleksandra Zee is making her mark and a lasting impression.

Aleksandra Zee
Aleksandra Zee
Aleksandra Zee
Aleksandra Zee
Aleksandra Zee
Aleksandra Zee

The Plucky Ones Q + A's: Anna Kövecses

Anna Kövecses is a self taught Hungarian born graphic artist that currently lives in Cyprus in a small seaside village with her family. Her striking and simple illustrations are a delight to what seems to be, everyone! All charmed by Anna's confident use of colour, shape and intriguing characters that sit within joyful compositions. Since working on an array of personal projects from her Colorodore poster collection to the Hungarian Alphabet book, Anna's clients now range from the The New York Times to the BBC. I am thrilled to welcome Anna to The Plucky Ones who's thoughtfully shared her story and adventures to us all. 

Anna Kövecses

Please tell us about your background and what inspired your journey into Illustration? 

My career started about 6 years ago but actually I've been deeply involved with creating stuff my whole life. I spent a lot of time alone as a kid since my parents were working all the time and we moved a lot from one town to the other. As there was often no one to play with I soon submerged in this "parallel universe" of making things. I just up-cycled pretty much everything I found and turned them into looms/toys/mobiles/artworks etc. For a really short period of time I had the ambition to go to a proper art school but shortly after graduating from high school and spending a year on a Greek island at the age of 20 (I sold my cheesy drawings of the small town and donkeys to tourists on the street) I discovered I was pregnant with my daughter so university was immediately out of my plans.

I started reading a lot of books on art and design instead and learned how to use my laptop for drawing things. At first I started out as a logo designer but found out pretty soon that corporate branding was not my piece of cake and turned to illustration instead. I did a lot of self initiated projects that gave me total freedom to explore myself and find my own style. In the meantime we had to leave Hungary as my boyfriend is actually a diver and Hungary did not have many possibilities on offer. First we moved to Egypt (right after the revolution there) which was quite an adventurous short period of time and then to Cyprus. Here we live in a small village by the sea and our daughter is already speaking Greek fluently in the local kindergarten.

Anna Kövecses

You’re a self taught illustrator & designer, yet have you had a mentor along the way? 

No, not really. But of course there are a lot of people whom I'm incredibly thankful to: magazine editors, bloggers, clients, agencies and design lovers who just simply saw something in what I do and encouraged me to keep on doing it. And, well actually the only other creative person in my family is my grandma, who first "explored" my talents and encouraged me to become an artist. She was a very enthusiastic forest landscape painter when she was young but never really took it further than a hobby. Anyway I think she always pictured me as a potter or a traditional painter working on elaborate still lifes in oil.

Coloradore Poster Collection

Coloradore Poster Collection

Anna Kövecses

Can you share what a typical Anna Kövecses day looks like? 

On an ordinary weekday, after my boyfriend and our daughter leave for work/kindergarten I usually spend the first 30 minutes doing nothing in particular holding a cup of tea in my hands as an excuse (this is the 30 minutes I always regret later at some point of the day). Then if I'm not in a hurry with work and I decide to be a good girl, I do 20-30 minutes of Pilates, which actually makes me feel 10 times better afterwards. So after an hour of warming-up and a quick shower I sit down to my tiny desk (the only way to prevent a mess is to have a tiny desk) and write a list of things to do into my notebook.

When I start working on a new project I always try to summarize key points first and take a lot of notes and sketches on paper. I also do research on the internet or select books and magazines from my shelf that are inspiring me. I usually have all my ideas ready in my head and my sketchbook by the time I turn on Adobe Illustrator, which is actually the only software I use. Then I try to realize these ideas on the screen. What I learned throughout the years is to try to really stick to and capture that first picture I had in my head when I started to think about the project. That first picture is usually a million times better than any of the ones later. I usually work until 1 pm when my daughter comes home from kindergarten, then we have a light lunch together and she goes to have a nap (luckily she's a good sleeper) so I have an extra 2-3 hours to finish my work.

Øyenvitne visual ID and book covers

Øyenvitne visual ID and book covers

Anna Kovecses

For those looking to leap into Illustration, could you share your top 3 lessons learnt?

1. The only way to learn and evolve is to look at the world with open eyes and really be interested in what other artists and thinkers have come up with. You have to be tolerant and pay attention to new ideas even if at first you have some stereotype against them. You need to let others inspire you but you should never copy them. You'll only be successful anyway if you can translate these impressions and use them to create something new, something that's yours and not somebody else's.

2.
Always make some time for yourself to get away from commissioned projects and indulge in some self initiated ones. Turn off your computer, grab a box of crayons or a pair of scissors and some colored paper and experiment! These little rituals can have an unbelievably refreshing effect on your work. You can even try stuff like open a new tumblr blog and publish your analog experiments (this is something I'm actually planning to do) or start a new project like you do a new poster every day for a given period of time (this is something I've already done).

3.
Learn to say yes and learn to say no.
Learn to say yes to situations that might not look beneficial for you at first. Like let's say a magazine approaches you because they need some illustrations but they have absolutely no budget for the project. So this means you do the work for free, but:

a: this can be a fabulous opportunity for you to try something new as they probably won't restrict your ideas too much.

b: your work can reach many potential readers and bring new and unexpected opportunities plus it looks good in your portfolio. The same thing applies to competitions and projects for a good cause.

And you definitely have to learn to say no (it's working very hard for me) if you're overbooked and see little chance to deliver quality artworks in such a short time or you feel that the client and you have very very distant notions of the project and the end result will be a compromise you will hate. 

Anna Kovecses
BBC 500 Words series of Illustrations

BBC 500 Words series of Illustrations

Can you tell us what projects you’re working on currently?

Well, there are a couple of illustration projects for large brands that are a secret. But something I can talk about is for example that I've been illustrating the Diagnosis column in the New York Times Magazine for a while now that comes out every 3 weeks I guess, so you might be able to see my works there for some time. I'm also working on a book cover for Syle Press for their newest novel, The Bride for Bedivere. You'll see a couple of my illustrations in the upcoming issue of Monocle too. And I'm trying very hard to make some time to work on my own projects that includes painting, drawing and many different handmade media.

You’ve worked on some fantastic projects with clients from The New York Times to the BBC. Of all the projects, which one are you most proud of?

I'm really proud of all of them but honestly the kindest to my heart are the projects that I've done for myself or my daughter, for example the Hungarian Alphabet book. These were the projects that brought the most appreciation for me from the art world.

Anna Kovecses
Hungarian Alphabet Book

Hungarian Alphabet Book

If you could collaborate with anyone in the world, who would this be and what impact would you hope to make?

It'd be fun to collaborate with a clothing brand to create prints for their garments. I don't really picture t-shirts here, rather something more abstract like scarves or fabrics.

And what plans or dreams do you have for 2014?

Well, my biggest dreams for this year are definitely revolving around the arrival of our baby son who is due to be born in early November. So far I haven't had any time to prepare for his welcoming so I'm definitely planning to go for maternity leave as soon as October begins and immerse in the lovely act of blanket knitting and crib assembling. I'm also planning to do a small series of artworks during this period of time and after his arrival that would be dedicated to him / us and preserve the memory of these incredible times.

Anna Kovecses

When you’re not working, how do you like to spend your time? 

I spend all of my free time with my small family. My boyfriend works a lot too so we really treasure every hour we can spend together. In Cyprus summer lasts practically 9 months a year so we usually go down to the sea every evening after we finish work. There's a small secret beach close to our home that lies at the bottom of a beautiful huge cliff wall. It's covered with fine sand and huge flat rocks and absolutely no one visits it apart from us. We watch the sun turning red and the three of us swim out to the open sea together. It feels so great to be this close to nature and this is why I couldn't imagine us living in a big city. I'm happy to see my daughter as she's immersed in playing with driftwood and pebbles instead of watching tv or playing on an iPad. At other nights we either go out to have dinner at the local communist cafe or drive to Nicosia, the island's capital to enjoy an open air film screening or concert.

Which creative plucky person/people do you admire and why?

I really admire the works of Ana Kras. She's really independent, spontaneous and beautiful and I wish I could have all that one day too. My other favorites are French artist duo, Atelier Bingo.

Milk X Magazine

Milk X Magazine

Anna Kovecses

A warm thank-you to Anna! To see more, make sure you visit Anna's Behance page and website.